Imagery and Glass Course Update

The last 2 weeks in my Imagery and Glass course have been a blast. We have been working with enamels, rayzist, and silk-screening. Loo Bain (recent MFA graduate in fibers) was amazing in guiding us through the silk-screening process. Also we have done experimental slumping and just received new bullseye slumping molds to play with. Next week we will be experimenting with using a flat scanner on 3-D glass objects- I love this project, check out the examples below of previous student scanned images.

– Jessica Jane Julius

Madeline Smith, Senior, Image made using the flat scanner on flameworked glass

Madeline Smith, Senior                                                      Image made using the flat scanner of flameworked glass

Colin Lusis image made from using a flat scanner

Colin Lusis, Senior                                                                   Image made from using a flat scanner, magnets, metal, sheet glass

Susie Sewell working on scanning project

Susie Sewell, senior, working on scanning project

glass object being scanned on a flat scanner

glass object being scanned on a flat scanner

Deborah Czeresko is in the studio!

Deborah is back! She was our Artist-in-Residence last semester and will be here working for three days between now and April. She will give a lecture on Wednesday April 17 at 1.30pm in Tyler 121. All are welcome!

photo-1 photo-2 photo-3 photo

Kris Martin’s lost wax castings

Image

kris martin
‘lost wax XI’
bronze and ceramic
8 7/16 x 15 5/8 x 1 3/16 in. (21.5 x 39.7 x 3 cm)
image © kris martin
photo: ben westoby
courtesy white cube

Image

kris martin
‘lost wax XII’ detail
bronze and ceramic
8 7/16 x 15 5/8 x 1 3/16 in. (21.5 x 39.7 x 3 cm)
image © kris martin
photo: ben westoby
courtesy white cube

“continuing his inquiry into the themes of chance, time and material metamorphosis, belgian artist kris martin has created a body of work that revisits the ancient technique of lost wax casting, on show at white cube mason’s yard until the 16th of march, 2013. having cast the emptied husks of real honey combs in bronze, martin lends a sense of permanence and durability to an otherwise ephemeral, fragile form. the series is a whimsical and almost playful reflection on the concept of transience, drawing attention to the sculpture’s transformative elements, as it shifts from nature into artifice.” – lara db on designboom

 

Laser Engraving on glass

We are very excited for 2 new additions to our Digital Fabrication Studio, a laser cutter and ceramic decal printer. This studio also gives students access to several 3D printers, 3D scanning, vinyl cutting and a ten-needle embroidery machine. The experimenting has begun in my imagery and glass course and by Senior Susie Sewell. Click here to see it in action.

Senior Susie Sewell testing the new laser cutter on sheet glass

Senior Susie Sewell testing the new laser cutter on sheet glass

 – Jessica Jane Julius

BOYD SUGIKI & LISA ZERKOWITZ January 30

This Wednesday, January 30, Tyler Glass will host Boyd Sugiki and Lisa Zerkowitz, the first artists in the Laurie Wagman Lecture Series in Glass at Tyler School of Art / Spring 2013. Lecture at 1.30pm in B089 and Demo 2.30 – 5.0pm in the Irvin Borowsky Glass Studios/Hot Shop. All are welcome!

Boyd Sugiki and Lisa Zerkowitz / Two Tone Studios Cane pitchers and tumblersBlown glass, 12”h (Pitcher), 3” – 4.5”h (Cups)

Boyd Sugiki and Lisa Zerkowitz / Two Tone Studios
Cane pitchers and tumblers
Blown glass, 12”h (Pitcher), 3” – 4.5”h (Cups)

Sugiki and Zerkowitz met as graduate students at the Rhode Island School of Design in the mid-nineties. After completing their degrees, they moved to Seattle, where they operate Two Tone Studios. Their work takes them all over the United States, Canada and overseas, for retail and wholesale shows, exhibitions, teaching opportunities and as visiting artists.

In the United States they have traveled as visiting artists or instructors to the following places: Appalachian Center for Crafts, Bay Area Glass Institute, California College of Arts and Crafts, Emporia State University, Firehouse No. 12, Haystack Mountain School of Crafts, Penland School of Crafts, Pilchuck Glass School, Pittsburgh Glass School, Pratt Fine Arts Center, Public Glass, Rhode Island School of Design, San Jose State University, Southern Illinois University, Third Degree Glass, University of Hawaii, and Virginia Commonwealth University.

Boyd SugikiLayersBlown glass, 18.5”x43.5”x11.5”, 2009

Boyd Sugiki
Layers
Blown glass, 18.5”x43.5”x11.5”, 2009

Beyond our borders, they have traveled to Turkey’s Glass Furnace, both Korea’s Kookmin University and Korea National University of the Arts, Japan’s Toyama Glass Art Institute as well as Kanazu Forest of Creation, and Alberta College of Art and Design in Canada.

Boyd’s addiction to fishing and Lisa’s love of hiking inspires them to travel to unique places where they can experience the outdoors while being exposed to different cultures. These trips allow them to come back to their studio refreshed and excited to create beautiful and contemporary hand blown glass objects that people can live with each day and enjoy fully.

Lisa ZerkowitzBeach BallsBlown & cold-worked glass, 4-15” diameter, 2011

Lisa Zerkowitz
Beach Balls
Blown & cold-worked glass, 4-15” diameter, 2011

www.twotonestudios.com
www.boydsugiki.com
www.lisazerkowitz.com

For more information, email sharyn.omara@temple.edu